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Great Booklist Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

Posted by on Oct 18, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Great Booklist Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

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Wright Brothers, Wrong Story: How Wilbur Wright Solved the Problem of Manned Flight.
By William Hazelgrove
Dec. 2018. 288p. Prometheus, $24 (9781633884588); e-book, $11.99 (9781633884595). 629.130092

Hazelgrove sets out to revise the commonly received story of aviation pioneers Wilbur and Orville Wright. Hazelgrove contends that Wilbur was by far the dominant brother, the real innovator, and that Orville did not contribute as much to the brothers’ success as conventional history has held. Having outlived Wilbur by several decades, Orville reworked history to make his own role equal to his brother’s. Family friend Fred Kelly, the Wright brothers’ official biographer, Hazelgrove contends, had a hand in this revision, changing Wilbur’s “I” to “we.” A little literary mathematics reveals that this official biography mentions Orville 25 percent more often than Wilbur. Hazelgrove also speculates on the brothers’ sex lives and the character of their sister Katharine, who kept house for their widowed father and was the only one of the siblings to graduate from college. Another conspirator appears to be Orville’s secretary Mabel Beck, who
fiercely guarded all access to Orville. Hazelgrove’s biography will surely add controversy to the history of these singular siblings who changed the world. Includes an extensive bibliography.

Wright Brothers Wrong Story

Publishers Weekly Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

Posted by on Oct 14, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Publishers Weekly Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

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The idea that Orville and Wilbur Wright were equals in ushering in the era of manned flight is a myth, posits Hazelgrove (Al Capone and the 1933 World’s Fair) in this intriguing recasting of the brothers’ now-legendary story. “The truth was,” he declares, “that Wilbur was the primary inventor and pilot”; Orville was “a glorified mechanic assisting his older, smarter, genius brother.” This fact was buried due primarily to two factors: the famous photo of the 1903 flight at Kitty Hawk, which immortalized Orville’s turn in the plane and thereby eclipsed Wilbur’s subsequent longer ride, and Wilbur’s early death from typhoid fever in 1912, which gave his brother 36 years to shape their story. Hazelgrove makes a strong case, citing numerous primary sources, notably Wilbur’s correspondence with engineer and aviation researcher Octave Chanute. The writing, however, can be rambling and repetitive, and awkward fictionalized passages from various characters’ perspectives distract from the solid thesis (“Wilbur turned, stared out the window…. Sand. Yes, the sands of time would cover it all…. This [plane] was one of his babies. Of course he would never have children…”). But despite these flaws, Hazelgrove’s original take on two of the pioneers of human flight will greatly interest flight buffs and popular-history aficionados. Agent: Leticia Gomez, Savvy Literary Services. (Dec.)

Amazing Kirkus Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

Posted by on Sep 25, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Amazing Kirkus Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A look at the true story behind the Wright brothers and their famous flights at Kitty Hawk.

For more than a century, Wilbur and Orville Wright have been touted as equal partners in the invention of the flying machine and of the concept of manned flight. Yet in this intriguing, well-researched treatise, Hazelgrove (Shots Fired in Terminal 2: A Witness to the Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooting Reflects on America’s Mass Shooting Epidemic, 2017, etc.) rejects that notion in favor of a more logical one: Wilbur was the genius behind the theory of putting a man in a machine that could soar like a bird, and Orville followed his brother’s instructions, assisting in the mechanical aspects of building the first airplane. The author also points out that it was just by chance that it was Orville’s turn to test the plane when the first photograph was taken. This coincidence made many assume that the brothers were operating on the same level, but as Hazelgrove demonstrates convincingly, they were far from it. Not only does he discuss the events at Kitty Hawk; the author delves into the Wright family dynamics: of the father who knew Wilbur was the brighter of the two boys; of how they remained at home their whole lives along with their sister, who only married late in life; and of the impact the death of their mother had on the children. Hazelgrove also ponders the sexualities of the three siblings and Wilbur’s grave illness, which may have given him the time in bed necessary to dream of flying. For anyone curious about the details behind the invention of the flying machine, this engaging book will inform and entertain as it turns an assumed piece of aviation history upside down.

Aviation history does a loop-the-loop as the author shares new and exciting insight into the history of the Wright brothers.
Kirkus Review of Wright Brothers Wrong Story

Pub Date: Dec. 4th, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-63388-458-8

Foreign Rights Sold to Chinese for Forging A President How the Wild West Created Teddy Roosevelt

Posted by on Sep 20, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Foreign Rights Sold to Chinese for Forging A President How the Wild West Created Teddy Roosevelt

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Forging A President How the Wild West Created Teddy Roosevelt is a History Book Club Selection, A Military Book Club Selection, A Conservative Book Club Selection and a Bestseller History Book Club.

SUMMER PICK HISTORY BOOK CLUB

“I found the story to be utterly compelling…this one is great! William Hazelgrove looks at history with a novelists eye.”

Rick Kogan, Chicago Tribune, WGN

Slate Magazine Article on 25th Amendment Cites Madam President

Posted by on Sep 7, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Slate Magazine Article on 25th Amendment Cites Madam President

41PuMuxrdrL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_Slate Article

Keynote Speaker Back to the Book Northeast Regional Library Convention

Posted by on Aug 30, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Keynote Speaker Back to the Book Northeast Regional Library Convention

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Back to the Book Exposition

Amazing Early Reviews for Wright Brothers Wrong Story

Posted by on Aug 24, 2018 in General News | Comments Off on Amazing Early Reviews for Wright Brothers Wrong Story

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“Well-researched and fascinating . . . a new portrayal of the Wright brothers’ legacy. . . . Combing through original archives and family letters, Hazelgrove reveals the differences in the brothers’ personalities and abilities, and how the myth of the Wright brothers was born. It’s a must-read for anyone interested in the early days of flight.”

—Henry M. Holden, author of 50-Years of Human Space Flight and aviation historian

“By far the best published work on the Wright brothers’ personal and professional lives. Thought-provoking and controversial in highlighting Wilbur’s brilliance in aeronautics and showing how he clearly overshadowed his brother’s contribution to manned flight. A must-read for academics and those interested in aviation history.”

—Alan C. Carey, author of We Flew Alone: Men and Missions of the United States Navy’s B-24 Liberator Squadrons

“This is an excellent retelling of an American myth. The author manages to turn Wilbur and Orville Wright, two legendary figures in American history, into living, breathing individuals. It is not only a first-rate dual biography but also a study of how myths and legends are created, and how facts can be turned inside out by different writers with different points of view. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book.”

—David Alan Johnson, author of The Last Weeks of Abraham Lincoln

“Many of humankind’s greatest achievements are often fraught with perils and problems that get lost in the unfurling of history. This is no exception. The intriguing saga of man’s quest for powered flight—perhaps one of the most significant accomplishments of all time—tells an amazing tale of amazing men accomplishing truly amazing things. But be prepared to be surprised. The story of what the Wright brothers did on Kill Devil Hill at Kitty Hawk in North Carolina at the turn of the last century not only opened new chapters in the history of the human race but also is filled with drama and tension beyond your wildest imaginings. Impeccably researched and absorbingly written, William Hazelgrove’s book is a must-read. I could not put it down.”

—Lionel Friedberg, New York Times–bestselling author and Emmy Award–winning cinematographer

“Hazelgrove applies a novelist’s narrative flair to aviation’s greatest saga. As if ‘merely’ conquering the air were not enough, the story involves dreams, ambition, technology, tragedy, suspicion, and deceit. Wright Brothers, Wrong Story challenges the traditional view—that Wilbur and Orville were equal partners—in a provocative and colorful dramatized history.”

—Michael Oakey, managing editor of the Aviation Historian

“I have, in general, not been a fan of the Wright brothers, mainly because their actions after the December 17, 1903, flights did a lot to suppress American aircraft development rather than expand it. However, Wright Brothers, Wrong Story is a brilliant work of research that tells their story much better than other books I have read about the Wrights. It is a valuable reference for those seeking the detailed truth of their historic work. Hazelgrove’s description of the Flyer’s flight tests clearly note that it was only the fourth flight, which lasted 59 seconds, that allowed them to claim ‘sustained, controlled flight.’ Nearly all other references mention only their first hop, which ended in a crash.”

—Burt Rutan, founder of two aircraft research companies and developer of the only nongovernment manned space-flight system

Wright Brothers Wrong Story