Recent News

Outstanding Booklist Review For Jack Pine!

Posted by on Apr 8, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on Outstanding Booklist Review For Jack Pine!

Outstanding Booklist Review For Jack Pine!

jackpine2[1]
Jack Pine.
By William Hazelgrove.
2015. 302p. Koehler, $29.95 (9781633930841); paper, (9781940192680); e-book (9781940192949).
First published April 15, 2015 (Booklist).

In northern Minnesota, a logger is found dead. At about the same time, a teenage girl claims that she was molested by a Native American, but then changes her story. Some concerned citizens wonder if the same man is responsible for both incidents, but Deputy Sheriff Reuger London isn’t inclined to jump to conclusions, as he’s convinced neither that the logger’s death was murder nor that the girl was really molested. Under pressure to close the cases, London soon finds himself stuck in the middle of a potentially violent conflict between loggers and environmentalists. Hazelgrove tells great stories (his last book was the wonderful Real Santa, 2014), and he creates believable, captivating characters. The people in Jack Pine feel like just that: people, not fictional characters. Hazelgrove gives these characters a tactile environment, the Minnesota Boundary Waters region near the Canadian border, and real voices (that distinctive upper-midwestern drawl we know from Fargo). Another fine effort from a very interesting writer. This one will appeal especially to William Kent Krueger fans.
—David Pitt

Top Hall of Fame Amazon Reviewer Grady Harp Gives Jack Pine Five Stars

Posted by on Apr 3, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on Top Hall of Fame Amazon Reviewer Grady Harp Gives Jack Pine Five Stars

Cjackpine2[1]hicago author William Hazelgrove has developed a significant following as the author of eight novels, Ripples, Tobacco Sticks Mica Highways Rocket Man, The Pitcher, Real Santa, and Jack Pine. While his books have received starred reviews in Publisher Weekly and Booklist, Book of the Month Selections, ALA Editors Choice Awards Junior Library Guild Selections and optioned for the movie, his major appeal is in his humanitarian approach to stories. William stays close too the heart in each of his stories, making each tale he spins one with which everyone can relate on an immediate or a remembered level.

His latest novel JACK PINE he has expanded his experience form visiting the Boundary Waters and getting to know the people and the land and the issues that are important to that part of the country and also having had the opportunity to ride around with a Deputy Sherriff and spend time at an old logging camp. It shows in his writing – even the scent of the pines becomes present in the room while you read.

The author’s synopsis serves the novel well: `When the sixteen year old daughter of a prominent attorney is raped in a woodshed and a logger found shot the next morning, Deputy Sheriff Reuger London becomes embroiled in a war between environmentalists, the Ojibwa Indians fighting for their timber rights, and the ruthless son of a powerful logger. Ben Johnson is the biggest logger in the Northwoods and his son Cliff will soon take over the business. Logging is dying a slow death from environmental restrictions and all that’s left are the scrub firs and jackpine. But far up in the Boundary Waters of Northern Minnesota are trees called the Old Pines. These three hundred year Norwegian pines are priceless and Johnson Timber wants them. A radical leader of Earth First, Tom Jorde, will do anything to stop the logging in the Boundary Waters. Then another logger is murdered and Jorde is implicated. The town pressures Reuger to stop the environmentalist and arrest an Indian, Tommy Toboken, for the rape of the girl. Tommy had saved his life once before and Reuger knows he is being setup. When he falls in love with the lawyer brought to town to defend Tom Jorde and realizes Johnson Timber is going to log out the Federally protected trees, Reuger is torn between old loyalties and what is right.’

Some how William manages to touch on sensitive issues in almost all of his novels – especially minorities (be those form South of the border or Native Americans) and contemporary concerns such as the environment. And while those issues make his novel appealing on sociology levels, the fact that he can write a story that propels along rather breathlessly to the end is what will continue his loyal following. JACK PINE is a thriller of the first class. Grady Harp, April 15

Pitcher 2 Out This Summer!

Posted by on Apr 3, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on Pitcher 2 Out This Summer!

Pitcher 2 Out This Summer!

9781633930025_FCThe Pitcher 2 The story of a broken down World Series pitcher who coaches a Mexican American boy to make the highschool team will be out this summer. William Hazelgrove’s The Pitcher was a Library Guild Selection.

Jack Pine Going On Kindle Sale April 1 3.99

Posted by on Mar 31, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on Jack Pine Going On Kindle Sale April 1 3.99

jackpine2[1]

The Mystery Thriller Jack Pine is going on Sale April 1 at a special release price of 3.99 The story of a strand of a logging war in the Boundary Waters has people comparing the book to the movie FARGO. A Deputy Sheriff comes between the loggers and the enviromentalists and must choose a side.

William Hazelgrove Signs Book Deal with Black Rose Writing for The Bad Author

Posted by on Mar 29, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on William Hazelgrove Signs Book Deal with Black Rose Writing for The Bad Author

William Hazelgrove has just signed a deal with Publisher Black Rose Writing for a forthcoming novel, The Bad Author. The story of a down on his luck novelist who starts killing people who gets in his way to the Bestseller List and the Literary Detective who tracks him down. Written in the style of Raymond Chandler The Bad Author will be published in September

JACK PINE BOOK LAUNCH PARTY MAGIC TREE BOOKSTORE APRIL 26TH 3PM!

Posted by on Mar 17, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on JACK PINE BOOK LAUNCH PARTY MAGIC TREE BOOKSTORE APRIL 26TH 3PM!

jackpine2[1]William Hazelgrove’s latest novel will kick off at the Magic Tree Bookstore in Oak Park Il on April 26th at 3PM. All are welcome! Jack Pine is an epic thriller set in the Boundary Waters with a fight over the last old timber in America. “A first rate crime thriller.” Book Chase

When the sixteen year old daughter of a prominent attorney is raped in a woodshed and a logger found shot the next morning, Deputy Sheriff Reuger London becomes embroiled in a war between environmentalists, the Ojibwa Indians fighting for their timber rights, and the ruthless son of a powerful logger. Ben Johnson is the biggest logger in the Northwoods and his son Cliff will soon take over the business. Logging is dying a slow death from environmental restrictions and all that’s left are the scrub firs and jackpine. But far up in the Boundary Waters of Northern Minnesota are trees called the Old Pines. These three hundred year Norwegian pines are priceless and Johnson Timber wants them.

A radical leader of Earth First, Tom Jorde, will do anything to stop the logging in the Boundary Waters. Then another logger is murdered and Jorde is implicated. The town pressures Reuger to stop the environmentalist and arrest an Indian, Tommy Toboken, for the rape of the girl. Tommy had saved his life once before and Reuger knows he is being setup. When he falls in love with the lawyer brought to town to defend Tom Jorde and realizes Johnson Timber is going to log out the Federally protected trees, Reuger is torn between old loyalties and what is right.

Great Book Chase Review of Jack Pine!

Posted by on Mar 16, 2015 in General News | Comments Off on Great Book Chase Review of Jack Pine!

jackpine2[1]Sheriff Reuger London’s job is not an easy one. His jurisdiction, one he works with a very limited amount of help, encompasses a remote forest area near the Canadian border almost completely populated by men – men to whom physical violence seems almost normal. To top it off, his is very much a company town dominated by the only employer of consequence anywhere around, Johnson Timber. And, because theirs is a dying industry that has attracted the attention of environmentalist activists wanting to finish the job of shutting the loggers down, the sheriff is sitting on a powder keg. When the 16-year-old daughter of a prominent lawyer who is vacationing with his family in a nearby fishing lodge is raped in a woodshed on lodge property, things get ugly.

Despite the usual violation of its treaties with the U.S. government resulting in more and more of its land being confiscated, the Ojibwa Indian Tribe now owns most of the still-unlogged forest remaining anywhere around Johnson Timber. The tribe, in fact, owns the most valuable trees still standing: acres and acres of 300-year-old Norwegian Pines coveted by every logger around. Now, though, one of the tribe’s own, Tommy Toboken, is being accused of raping the lawyer’s daughter – and it is up to his old friend Sheriff Reuger London to bring him in.

But after someone starts shooting loggers, Sheriff London has more to worry about than Tommy Toboken. Soon Ben Johnson, owner of Johnson Timber, is pointing fingers at the environmentalists; the environmentalists are pointing fingers at the loggers; and the Indians don’t trust anyone on either side. Now London has to figure out how to stop the sniper before he kills again. Even though the environmentalists have the most obvious motive for shooting at loggers, Sheriff London decides to widen the scope of his investigation, and soon everyone around him is ducking for cover.

Jack Pine is a first-rate crime thriller very much dependent upon the setting in which Hazelgrove has placed it. The author vividly portrays a lifestyle and a physical environment few Americans ever get the opportunity to see for themselves, and that is a big part of the fun of Jack Pine. But because I am so unfamiliar with the accent and speech patterns of the area, the phrasing of some of the dialogue became noticeably repetitive after a while. Although I suspect that Hazelgrove accurately portrays the conversational pattern of his novel’s setting, I grew weary of how many times I had to read “oh, ya” or “oh, ya, you bet.” I just do not have the experienced ear required to “hear” the dialogue of this region, and the overuse of “oh, ya” became an irritant.

Bottom Line: Despite my quibble about dialogue, this is a fine thriller with an intriguing setting.